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Old 2011-08-16, 01:27 PM   #181
oberst
 
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Feel free to hunt around for anything you feel like. You'll find there is no "rental window" before DVD sales - Canadian rental shops start renting on the same date they go on sale. If anything, the studios want the reverse, a "sales-only" window, and in the US some have negotiated with Netflix and Redbox to get a 28-day non-rental window for new releases, but in return those companies are getting cheaper copies and/or back catalog streaming rights. Blockbuster US doesn't do this, and rents from day 1.

I think the EU (or at least the UK) does have some sort of "lending rights" provision, and DVD rental companies there do in some form provide compensation to the studios.
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Old 2011-08-16, 01:31 PM   #182
hugh
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Quote:
Netflix is a video on demand (VOD) service
I can live with calling it a Subscription VOD service but its not a VOD service.

The difference is the "subscription" service has exclusive content. Often with VOD, that service is available elsewhere.
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Old 2011-08-16, 02:00 PM   #183
NeilN
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I don't see how it isn't a VOD service. I pick the video, it gets streamed to me. The exclusive content is irrelevant.

Taking another example, Spotify (and probably eventually Rdio) has exclusive tracks available only to their customers. But it's still a music on demand service, nothing more, nothing less.
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Old 2011-08-19, 10:37 PM   #184
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Exclamation Netflix vs the World

Netflix is a VOD killer and a subscription service with exclusive content that no Canadian TV station can broadcast (even if it wanted to). I don't think of Netflix as a TV station because I can't get it without using the Internet. I am currently watching TMN and TMN On Demand through Rogers Cable TV, without needing the Internet to do so. Netflix is offering a different service and most Canadian companies will never be willing to compete with Netflix at such a low price point of $8 (without the need to subscribe to a TV service as well).

Netflix uses the Internet to sidestep the CRTC and its cronies. Now, it's up to the CRTC to figure out a way to keep Netflix in line, even though it's only an online subscription service with some exclusive content. The longer the CRTC waits, the stronger Netflix can become.

If Netflix can reach the 5 million Canadian subscribers mark, it then might be too late for the CRTC to stop Netflix from having enough power to lockup even more exclusive content. First you get the subscribers, then you get the money, then you get the power to steal all the hot mistresses and girlfriends away from the Canadian CEOs.

-------------

As for Blockbuster Canada (and even Rogers Plus), you will notice if you check its store shelves, that it carries many DVDs and Blu-rays from America (USA UPCs), rather than the Canadian versions that other Canadian stores carry. It doesn't happen that often, but still often enough to realize that it must have better options than some of its Canadian competitors (like Zip.ca). Zip and other Canadian companies are often encouraged to buy from Canadian suppliers, whereas Blockbuster Canada seems to avoid this restrictive practice quite often.

Blockbuster USA (and perhaps even Blockbuster Canada to some extent) has had exclusive content deals with The Weinstein Company as far back as 2006 for titles that the Rogers Video stores failed to carry, but that was because the extra cost to get those "exclusive" titles wasn't worth it for Rogers, based on the low potential for actual rentals. There were several Blockbuster USA, DVD titles that Blockbuster Canada carried that the Rogers Video stores didn't. Should the CRTC have tried to regulate Blockbuster Canada because of a possible unfair advantage for lower prices? Of course not! However, had Blockbuster USA taken over Blockbuster Canada, and become truly American, I wouldn't put it past Rogers to complain to somebody about the injustice of the whole thing ... until Rogers started to get even better exclusives of its own.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-relea...-53531487.html
[Whining about Weinstein]

http://uchicagolaw.typepad.com/facul...uster-exc.html
[First-sale doctrine and what the Blockbuster USA/Weinstein Company exclusives really mean]

Quote:
So long as The Weinstein Co. sells these DVDs to the public, Netflix can buy them and rent them out, as indeed it does. Blockbuster’s exclusivity then is mainly about prices and advertising. In agreeing to in-store promotions of the Weinstein movies and guaranteed payments, Blockbuster is ensuring presumably better pricing for the DVDs than Netflix will be able to get in the retail sales market. (Query: does Netflix buy these in bulk from Wal-Mart or Costco?) The Weinstein Co. of course could abandon the sales market and thereby give Blockbuster genuine exclusivity, but Blockbuster isn’t willing to pay for that. Instead, given the sales channel, the exclusive deal with Blockbuster gets Weinstein Co. superior in-store advertising, while raising Netflix’s costs of competing.

Plus there is a hint that the exclusivity is slightly more complicated. The Blockbuster website suggests that the Blockbuster versions of these films comes with special bonus content. The Renée Zellweger vehicle Miss Potter comes with “a fascinating first-person account of Renée’s experience from pre-production through completion of filming” taken from “rare footage from the set.”
Paramount is just one of the companies that I recall experimented with having specially selected DVD titles (generally box office bombs) available for Rental only, for about 4 to 6 weeks BEFORE having them available for Sale in both Canada and the US (usually with added Special Features). I haven't noticed any recent DVD titles that became available for rent before a Retail version was made available with Special Features, but since I don't follow that kind of stuff as closely as I used to, I suppose there might have been a few recent ones that I didn't notice.

Many studios still offer certain DVD and Blu-ray titles that are available for Rent that don't include the Special Features that the Retail versions have (like "No Strings Attached"), as a way to perhaps encourage more sales (for both the cheaper rental versions and the more robust Retail versions).

http://www.mwtnewsandviews.com/2009/...tiered_02.html
[Paramount dances around the DVD Rental/Retail window]

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/blu...lthrough-16568
[Dance, Dance Revolution of the DVD rentals]

Since any Canadian with a decent Internet connection can subscribe to Netflix for only $8, it's up to the CRTC to make sure that Netflix doesn't become more popular than the offerings through the Canadian companies. Killing the US competition is job #1 at the CRTC ... something about preserving our imaginary culture is the excuse that is often used.
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Old 2011-08-23, 10:47 PM   #185
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Thumbs down

The CRTC is getting as out-dated as the old cronies sitting on it. Trust me, there's nothing they'd love more than to have all of us back to using 300bps modems and watching "The Beachcombers" again like good little Canadian drones.

They are struggling to keep up more and more and hopefully they'll throw in the towel someday. When is our government going to realize that Canadians are not as stupid as they think we are? Do they actually believe that what we watch on TV will ruin our cultural identities? It is an insult to all Canadian's to even suggest media is what makes us Canadian. We need to send E-mails to our local MPs calling for an overhaul of the CRTC and hope that this new government will listen better than the last. Given the state of the economy it would seem fitting to see it's demise as a good cost saving measure.

Netflix is still in a CRTC choke hold as to how much it can publish, what and when it can. The CRTC has always seemed very fascist to me and frankly, I as are many other Canadians are fed up with them!

Anyhow, I am done venting on this now..
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Old 2011-09-09, 12:51 AM   #186
Francois Caron
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I recently wrote an article for my UBB Deception site about the CRTC's fact finding exercise on OTT services, and what I believe is the true objective of these so-called 35 industry leaders. The Mark News Web site trimmed my article down and polished it up so it would be easier to read, and published it on their Web site.

http://www.themarknews.com/articles/...ve-a-cash-grab

You can read the original article that I like to call my long winded and exhausting "why-every-writer-needs-an-editor" Director's Cut edition! Be advised that it does veer off from the main subject matter a few too many times, which is why I'm glad it was edited down.

http://theubbdeception.ca/2011/08/cr...xes-and-the-35
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Old 2011-09-09, 08:41 AM   #187
woodsie
 
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Great article Francois. Your article truly addresses the OP with why they are drawing criticism. Reading about these "35" makes me think of a spoiled little rich kid who can't make it on their own and goes crying to Mommy and Daddy whenever his/her weekly allowance runs out.

This "nanny state" mentality has to stop and thankfully the internet is finally helping give us Canadians the liberty and freedom we are entitled to under the Canadian constitution.
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Old 2011-09-12, 03:35 PM   #188
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Post Astral whines, yet again.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...rticle2162618/

Quote:
In a speech Monday, Astral chief executive Ian Greenberg called it “unfair competition.”

Astral and most other Canadian broadcasters, have pressed the federal broadcast regulator for stiffer rules on Netflix operations in Canada so all movie providers face a level playing field – no matter whether they broadcast over the airwaves, on cable or via the Internet.
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Old 2011-09-12, 03:44 PM   #189
woodsie
 
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Lol... Astral is crying like a baby to Mama yet again because they don't want to share their ice cream with the other kids.

Sad. You watch though, the CRTC will try it's hardest to look out for our....errrr.. I mean Astral's best interest once again by trying to squeeze Netflix any way they can find. I wonder what they'll try to do which will ultimately mean picking my pocket.
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Old 2011-09-12, 03:47 PM   #190
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Netflix indeed is a new competitor to movie Channels which is one of the bread and butter of Astral... really, nothing stops Astral from making deals with studios, then sell a movie channel subscription off the Internet. But they would not want to 1- take the risk of spending on IT, 2- risk their relationship with the cable companies, 3-cannibalize their own movie channel off cable business
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Old 2011-09-12, 04:16 PM   #191
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Netflix is not a competitor for movie channels. It competes with PPV and VOD services, which are basically unregulated. The problem is that Netflix provides unlimited viewing for $8/mo while existing services charge up to $8 per movie or TV show. No wonder the CCBRB is getting upset. They have real competition for a change.

* CCBRB - Canadian Cartel of Broadcasting Robber Barons
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Old 2011-09-12, 04:23 PM   #192
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We'll agree to disagree. As I have said before and not agreed with others, Netflix competes with many things, but first and foremost Movie Channels. Where can you get a subscription-based, all you can eat movie service equivalent ? From a Movie Channel, which sometimes has a free VOD option added. TMN, Movie Central, Super Ecran, ...

Netflix also competes with video rental stores too. It sure didn't help out Blockbuster and Movie Gallery in the US.
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Old 2011-09-12, 05:12 PM   #193
hugh
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Why is Astral whining?

Astral and Netflix are competitors and they should have to abide by the same rules.

If Astral has to spend millions on Canadian content and pay millions into Canadian content funds then so should Netflix if they want to do business in this country. Personally I don't think Astral should have to pay millions into Canadian content funds but that is the subject of another thread
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Old 2011-09-12, 06:44 PM   #194
MarcP
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Did Netflix have to apply for a broadcasting license to offer their service in Canada? No. So what can the CRTC do? Pull something that doesn't exist? Should we have a great firewall of Canada to block them?
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Old 2011-09-12, 07:50 PM   #195
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I suspect one of the options one the table would be to waive these mandatory fund contributions for everybody to make it fair game. I would not oppose that.
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